Memories

Nineteen forty-four

 

County is in nation’s top 100

 

Voters in the Bristol School District put to rest speculation about where their kids will be educated next year by approving a merger with Groton. It was the second close election in three months as 272 voted in favor of this reorganization plan while 232 opposed it.

A dozen media representatives from South Dakota, including Stacey Williams Dunse and LeAnn Suhr, Webster, witnessed and took part in some of the 2nd Battalion’s training exercises at a Fort Sill, OK base camp. Many local men had spent the past week training for the inevitable deployment to Iraq.

Webster School board members opened 63 bids on 21 various bid packages for the new high school at a special meeting Jan. 21.

 

Matthew Scott Thorson claimed the 1994 Baby Derby at Lake Area Hospital Jan. 20 by being the first new baby to check in at the hospital. The son of Ann and Scott Thorson, he was greeted by Dr. Kevin Bjordahl. Matthew’s mother is the pharmacist at the hospital and his father is a teacher and coach at Groton High School.

Webster City Council, meeting in special session approved the first reading of a one cent sales tax to assist with the construction of a new medical office building, remodeling at Lake Area Hospital and capital improvements for the City of Webster. The ordinance would remain in effect for up to 10 years to collect a total of $1 million toward the $3 million project.

Coach John Schiley’s wrestlers crowned six champions, chalked up 19 points and rolled up 242.5 points to win the Gettysburg Tournament. They rolled over Northwestern 70-0 and Aberdeen Roncalli 65-3 at a triangular in Aberdeen.

 

A closer look at the heart disease situation in Day County is in order as February will be Heart Disease Month. The latest figures detailing the 33 principal causes of death show that heart disease continues to rank first in the local area. Nationally, it represents the greatest threat to human life, more so than cancer, accidents, pneumonia and all other diseases combined. Fully 72.1 percent of all deaths in Day County are due to heart disease.

North and South Waubay lakes in Day County were among those announced by the Department of Game, Fish & Parks as open to promiscuous fishing. The lakes were opened because of the danger of fish suffocating because of snow conditions. Fish may be taken without limit by hook and line, spears, snagging, dip nets and legal minnow seines. Drugs, explosives, illegal number of lines and hooks are not allowed.

Something new in electric power line construction, a pole made of concrete, has been built by East River Electric Power Cooperative in an experimental line just west of Howard. Thirty-eight pre-stressed concrete poles, manufactured in Salem were erected in mid-December by East River construction specialists.

 

Milwaukee railroad’s eastbound Olympian waited in Webster 48 minutes under conductor’s orders while it was determined whether it could beat a race with the stork to Minneapolis. The passenger thought she could but the conductor wanted to be sure. The decision was in the affirmative following examination by a doctor from Peabody Hospital. The train proceeded on its way to Minneapolis where the stork is reported to have made his appearance. The young woman was from Pennsylvania and was en route home following a trip to the Pacific Coast where she had visited her husband in military service.

Day County won three places on the nation’s list of 100 foremost counties in production of flax, spring wheat and oats according to an Associated Press dispatch appearing in the Sioux Falls Argus Leader.

The room in the basement of the new City Hall used as a meeting place for Boy and Girl Scouts is being improved to make it an attractive recreation room. Under the direction of Scout leaders Art Lundquist and Ernest Christensen, games have been secured including table tennis, shuffle-board and others. Steps are being taken to improve the acoustics.

 

George McMillan, Waubay has opened a restaurant in the Severy building in Webster where he will be pleased to have old friends and the public in general who may want anything in his line. He is now prepared to set up meals, lunches, oysters, etc. Will keep a full supply of cigars, candies, oranges, lemons, nuts, apples, fruit and vegetables of all kinds in their season.

 

Note: No book is available for the year 1919.

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